THE GREAT MAGAL OF TOUBA

Ahmadou Bamba, a fervent Muslim who is venerated today by over 10 million disciples across the world. Touba - Senegal.

© C.BENE - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

Images

THE GREAT MAGAL OF TOUBA



Buried in the crowd at the back of the old yellow Berliet truck, Mamadou can see only a sliver of the dark sky above, there, between the silhouette of the trees. It’s midnight and dead-cold, 150 kilometers in on the road from Dakar to Touba.

A motley crew of cars are pressed bumper to bumper, carrying their human cargo – pilgrims on their way to the holy city of Touba.

Mamadou, who cannot see the road, asks the people perched on the sides, “Where are we”. “At Thies, at djourbel!” they cry, depending on the village. Mamadou shivers and looks for warmth in the bodies of his fellow passengers. They are over a hundred, piled into the back of this old truck. They left together from Medina, Dakar, at 8 euros a head, for the night trip. Suddenly, some passengers begin to chant. Soon, the whole back of the truck is singing… encouraged… Touba is growing nearer…

They arrive in tens of thousands from across Senegal and abroad. The crammed bush taxis, the overcrowded trains, the rattling buses making several trips a day…. flashy Mercedes, screaming motorbikes, exhausted pedestrians – everyone’s going to Touba, some 150 Kms from Dakar, towards the interior of Senegal, for one moment each year privileged above all the rest: the Great Magal.

Touba is the capital for Mouridism, an Islamic movement founded at the end of the 19th century by the holy man Ahmadou Bamba, a fervent Muslim who is venerated today by over 10 million disciples across Senegal and the world. These are the Mourides, a fraternity of orthodox Sunni turned towards Suffism, and hence toleration and non-violence. They are a particular group because for them work, sharing, and helping others is emphasized over ritual.

Work almost seems to replace prayer when the successful Mouride helps his brothers by his success.

This has given rise to a number of spectacular success stories, as much for the "marabouts”, the spiritual masters of the Mourid movement, as for the "Talibés", or devoted disciples, who are often found at the head of large companies or flourishing businesses. Inevitably, this has raised some eyebrows, and the Mourids are sometimes accused of illegal trafficking and wrongdoing. But there are black sheep among every people, and the Mourid emphasis on the sacredness of work has allowed the Mourids to create a type of tacit understanding between themselves, much like the Free Masons.

And now - the Great Magal, celebrated on the 18th of the lunar month of Safar, the date that Ahmadou Bamba returned to Senegal after 12 years of exile in Gabon and Mauritania for the unjustified fear his growing popularity gave to colonial authorities. This is the day his disciples are urged to commemorate, and offerings fall like rain.

Donations of all kinds come to the marabouts: bits and pieces from the poorest; billfolds, bags, huge checks of money from the rich.

Touba, the holy city managed by the General Khalif of the Mourides, Serigne Salliou M'Backé, is almost a state within a state. It collects a considerable fortune over the 3-day celebration and the donations are given to help support the decisions of the movement’s chiefs. 2,3,4 million pilgrims… the villages and Senegals countryside emptied… farms shut… stores closed … but a pervasive fervor perhaps only comparable to that found at Mecca, Lourdes, or on the banks of the Ganges.

After being set up in a ‘dahra’ or school directed by a marabout, the pilgrims spill from every corner of the city, already at 500,000, towards the city center, to the immense mosque that seats 5000 and extends 90 meters high. They come to participate, even from afar, in the prayers and ceremonies, and to approach the mausoleums of Mouridism’s holy men.

The Senegalese government hasn’t much say here and the management and often remarkable achievements at Touba (water, lighting, hygiene…) silences the critics. Well aware of the influence of Mouridism, politicians tend to respect the wishes of the brotherhood.

There are other sources of revenue. 30 kilometers or so from the city, the Khelkom domain extends over thousands of hectares. This land belongs to the high marabouts (in particular, the M’Backé), and groundnuts, the local crop, are here grown. The soil is cultivated by disciples, who volunteer their work for free. Sometimes, their number reaches up to 10,000. The profits are far from negligible - considering the price of labor - but the talibé are devoted to the marabouts, and Khelkom, too, is alive with joy and fervor.

Each Dahra looks after the lodging, food and health of the pilgrims.

Services are looked after by the Baye Fall, "Sons of the Fall", named after the most devoted talibé of Bamba: Ibrahima Fall. Painted, dreadlocked, bearing harlequin-like dress and leather shoulder-belts, the Baye Fall maintain order and harmony, without severity.

Come night, come songs to the glory of God… an endless litany lifting one into a trance, lifting one into total communion with God through the spirit of Bamba.

One part Woodstock, rave party, and festival, the celebration is nonetheless sustained by an everpresent spiritualism found in the chats, the consultations, and the personal advice that the marabouts share with their disciples.

The celebration ends, departures are readied, and while hearts and wallets may be a little lighter, souls have been filled with joy and peace.

Next year, the Great Magal promises to be bigger again.

René Sintzel



LE GRAND MAGAL DE TOUBA



Perdu dans les entrailles de tôle du vieux camion Berliet jaune, Mamadou ne voit qu’un carré de ciel noir, là-haut, où se découpent parfois des silhouettes d’arbres. Il doit être minuit,froid vif sur cette route de Dakar à Touba, à 150 kilomètres.

Les véhicules hétéroclites qui se pressent pare-chocs à pare-chocs transportent des cargaisons humaines, pèlerins pour la cité sainte de Touba.

Souvent, Mamadou,qui ne voit rien de la route, interroge les occupants perchés sur les ridelles : « où sommes-nous ? », « A Thies, à djourbel ! » lui répond-on selon l’avancée du voyage. Mamadou frissonne, cherchant la chaleur des autres passagers empilés, comme lui, à plus de cent dans le vieux camion. Il est parti de Medina, Dakar, avec ses compagnons, il a payé 8 euros le passage, une nuit entière de voyage !

Soudain quelques passagers entament un chant religieux ; bientôt c’est tout le camion qui chante, le courage revient, Touba se rapproche !

C'est par dizaines de milliers qu'ils arrivent de tous les coins du Sénégal et même de l'étranger. Taxis brousses bondés, trains surchargés, cars rapides brinquebalants dont les chauffeurs effectuent plusieurs rotations par jour, luxueuses Mercedes, motos pétaradantes et piétons exténués. Tous vont vers Touba, vers l'intérieur du Sénégal, à 150 Kms de Dakar, la capitale, pour un moment annuel privilégié: le Grand Magal.

Touba, capitale du Mouridisme, mouvement spirituel islamique fondé à la fin du XIXe siècle par un fervent musulman, un saint homme, Ahmadou Bamba, aujourd’hui vénéré par plus de 10 millions d'adeptes, au Sénégal et dans le Monde: les Mourides.

Il s'agit d'une confrérie de rigoureuse orthodoxie sunnite, orientée vers le Soufisme donc spirituelle, non-violente et tolérante. Son originalité consiste dans le fait que le rite y tient moins de place que le travail, le partage, l'entraide. Travailler remplace presque la prière du moment que le Mouride "arrivé" fait bénéficier ses corelégionnaires de sa réussite.

Ceci a donné lieu à des réussites spectaculaires, aussi bien chez les "marabouts” , les maîtres spirituels du mouvement mouride, que chez leurs "Talibés" (disciples) dévoués, qui sont souvent à la tête d'importantes Sociétés et de juteuses affaires. Cet état de choses a, bien sûr, porté certains à la critique et les puissants Mourides sont parfois soupçonnés de trafics et d’illégalités. Les moutons noirs existent dans tous les troupeaux ! Cependant le principe a permis de créer une entente tacite entre tous les adeptes, comparable à celle des Francs-maçons par exemple.

Alors le jour du Grand Magal, le 18 du mois lunaire de safar, anniversaire du retour de Ahmadou Bamba au Sénégal après un exil de 12 ans au Gabon et en Mauritanie, victime de la crainte injustifiée qu'il inspirait à la puissance coloniale, et ce jour-là, tous sont conviés à la commémoration et les offrandes pleuvent. Piécettes pour les plus pauvres, liasses, valises, gros chèques pour les riches. Dons de toutes natures aux marabouts.

Touba, ville sainte créée de toutes pièces et gérée par le Khalife Général des Mourides : Serigne Salliou M'Backé, véritable état dans l'état, engrange une fortune considérable en 3 jours et cette manne servira officiellement les desseins des chefs du mouvement. 2,3,4 millions de pèlerins, les villes et les campagnes sénégalaises vidées de leurs habitants, les commerces fermés, les services en panne mais une ferveur inégalée qu'on ne retrouve peut-être qu'à la Mecque, Lourdes ou au bord du Gange.

Venant de tous les quartiers de la ville qui ne cesse de s'accroître et compte déjà 500 000 habitants, les pèlerins, installés dans leurs "dahras" dirigés par un marabout, marchent vers le centre de Touba, vers l'immense mosquée de 5000 places et son minaret de 90 m, pour participer, même de loin, aux prières et cérémonies et approcher les mausolées des saints hommes du Mouridisme.

L’état sénégalais n’a pas vraiment son mot à dire sur cette gestion et les réalisations souvent remarquables à Touba (eau, éclairage, santé…) neutralisent les critiques ; de plus les politiciens, conscients de la puissance mouride, ont tendance à favoriser les aspirations de la confrérie.

Il existe d’autres sources de revenus. A une trentaine de Kms de la ville s’étend le domaine de Khelkom sur des milliers d’hectares. Ce terrain appartient aux grands marabouts (notamment les M’Backé), on y cultive l’arachide, richesse de cette région. La terre est travaillée par les talibés volontaires venus bénévolement pour un séjour de labeur. On en compte parfois plus de 10 000 !Les revenus dégagés de cette exploitation sont loin d’être négligeables, vu le coût de la main d’œuvre, mais un talibé se doit à son marabout et Khelkom, aussi, exhale cet esprit de joie et de ferveur.

Chaque Dahra prend en charge l'hébergement, la nourriture, l'hygiène des pèlerins. Les services sont assurés par les Baye Fall, "Fils de Fall", du nom du plus dévoué talibé de Bamba: Ibrahima Fall. Colorés, nattés, costumes d'Arlequin et baudrier de cuir, les Baye Fall font régner, sans rudesse, ordre et harmonie.

La nuit venue les chants à la gloire de Dieu s'élèvent en litanies interminables jusqu'à la transe, jusqu'à la communion totale avec Dieu dans l'esprit de Bamba.

Un côté Woodstock, rave party, festival, avec une spiritualité omniprésente, renforcée encore par les causeries, les consultations, les conseils personnels que les marabouts dispensent à leurs talibés.La Fête se termine, les départs s'organisent, les coeurs et les bourses sont plus légers, mais les âmes ont fait le plein.

L'an prochain au Grand Magal ils seront encore plus nombreux.

René Sintzel



REPORTS

ABOUT

Christophe Bene is a self-taught photographer currently based in Paris, France. His work is mainly inspired by the man/nature relationship. Straddling the border between art and documentary photography, Christophe Bene offers original prints saturated with colour. Born in Douala, Cameroon in 1969, Christophe began shooting pictures at 16. After three years in French Polynesia, he left at 20 years old for a two-year degree in advertising communication in Paris followed by the French Conservatoire Libre du Cinéma before specializing at the ecole nationales superiore Louis Lumière in film and photography. From 1994 to 1999, he was assistant photographer, main photographer and post-producer for cinematic advertising. Upon returning to Africa in 1999, he undertook a wide range of work, shooting in Senegal in 2002 and directing the Triptik Senegal exhibition in collaboration with PICTO laboratories and various sponsors. He has won first prize in RED, the largest photo contest in the world, as organized by PHOTO. In 2002, he met the journalist René Sintzel, an Africa specialist, with whom he has since collaborated to produce documentaries on West Africa. In December 2002, he joined the GAMMA agency. In 2005, he worked together with JANVIER and DIGITAGENT - THE REPORT PARIS laboratories to produce the “Lion Kings of Medina” documentary. In 2006, WPN New York took charge of representing his photo documentaries and select art photos in the US. From 2008 to 2011, he covered the BENE DAKHLA music and slide festival in southern Morocco. He currently works on order for national and international brands, magazines and newspapers. His Aerial photography, which he has done since his first documentary, has become both his area of expertise and his passion. Exhibitions include: 1997 - Kaïna - Travel Polynesians 2002 - Senegal TRIPTIK 2005 - The Three Lions of Medina 2009- 5 Prints / 5 photographers photographs Group exhibition as part of FIAC at Galerie SPARTS Reports 2000 - A day in Senegal - Senegalese Logbook. 2003 - White Gold Rose Lake. 2003 - Violin Ivry Gitlis a globetrotter. 2004 - The Three Lions of Medina. 2006 - Return of the Bou El Mogdad. 2007 - The Grand Magal of Touba. 2008 - Dakhla Festival 2009 - FANTASIA Publications LIBÉRATION - LE MONDE - L'EXPRESS - ULYSSE - COURRIER INTERNATIONAL - LE PELERIN Magazine - REPONSE PHOTO - PHOTO Magazine - SHOCK Magazine - PHOTO VIDEO NUMERIQUE - LA TERANGA (FRANCE & SENEGAL) - TEL QUEL (MAROC) - AMOUAGE (MAROC).

Images

CONTACT

  • Mail Box / christophe@cbene.com


  • Phone / +33 6 25 01 72 88

    Adress / 36, Av de Flandre - 75019 Paris - France

CHRISTOPHE BENE - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.